Diabetes


 

Startling Statistics

While taking care of your feet is vital to everyone, for people with diabetes, taking care of their feet is even more so. More than 60 percent of all non-traumatic lower-limb amputations are related to complications from Diabetes, according to the American Diabetes Association. These amputations are preventable with careful monitoring and regular foot screenings performed by a podiatrist.

Diabetes and Your Feet

Ulcers (open sores on feet) are the most common diabetes-related foot problem. However, serious conditions such as neuropathy, skin changes, calluses, poor circulation, and infection are also possible. Nerve damage common among diabetic patients can cause a person with an ulcer or injury to be unaware of it until it becomes infected, which can lead to partial or full amputation of the foot or lower leg.

Warning Signs:

Ulcers (open sores on feet) are the most common diabetes-related foot problem. However, serious conditions such as neuropathy, skin changes, calluses, poor circulation, and infection are also possible. Nerve damage common among diabetic patients can cause a person with an ulcer or injury to be unaware of it until it becomes infected, which can lead to partial or full amputation of the foot or lower leg. 

  • Changes in skin color
  • Swelling of the foot or ankle
  • Numbness or tingling
  • Open sores that are slow to heal
  • Ingrown or fungal toenails
  • Bleeding corns and calluses
  • Dry cracks in the skin/heel

Warning Signs:

Inspect feet daily. Make a habit of checking your feet and toes every day for breaks in the skin, bruises, sores, or changes to the toenails. Thickening or discoloration are a concern.

Wear thick, soft socks. Protect your feet with socks that will not irritate your skin. Avoid socks with seams, which can cause blisters or other skin injuries.

Exercise. As for all good health, exercise is key. Walking can help control blood sugar, keep weight down, and improve circulation. Always wear appropriate athletic shoes when exercising.

Have new shoes properly measured and fitted. Shoes that fit properly are very important to those with diabetes.

Don’t go barefoot. Don’t go without shoes, even in your own home. The risk of breaks in the skin and a resulting infection is too great for those with diabetes.

See a podiatrist. Make a minimum of two appointments per year with a podiatrist to have your feet examined. This is a critical step in avoiding complications or amputation.

Location
F. Keith Nebeker DPM
10463 Double R Blvd, Suite 100
Reno, NV 89521
Phone: 775-200-0036
Fax: 775-358-1413
Office Hours

Get in touch

775-200-0036